It’s Not Easy Being a Remote Worker

It’s not easy: There’s something inherently familiar about crunching numbers with your fingers while tapping away on a keyboard, just because you’re stuck without one. Maybe you think it’s the ease with which you…

It's Not Easy Being a Remote Worker

It’s not easy: There’s something inherently familiar about crunching numbers with your fingers while tapping away on a keyboard, just because you’re stuck without one.

Maybe you think it’s the ease with which you can travel from one place to another. You can search for work remotely, and find yourself with an extension to your hours. Or maybe you’re a busy woman who’s at the office, but has spent most of your week in front of your laptop, outside of your own family. Maybe you’re a cubicle lifer whose team, even with new rotations and new colleagues, can’t match the work the same team puts in eight hours a day.

Whatever the reason, here’s a nugget of wisdom you may have forgotten: It’s not only due to physical space. It’s due to this fundamental issue: Not a lot of it.

Consider the technological advances that allow us to travel to our work: we can get directions to an employer or call up a potential new co-worker. But it seems that there are more technical advances we can’t use yet – for whatever reason.

For example, who has the needed Internet access to even access these services from their desk?

It’s like your social media page: You have different tastes. Someone sends you a photo of their honeymoon that you never intended to see, but you can’t simply unfriend. These services usually demand each party to provide their own services, and often have specific, email-based tools in place for both communication and communication functionality.

This “grind” of preparation is in both mobile applications as well as desktop software – especially when employees switch computers to the same computer. And often, when times get lean, people are more likely to give their power to their project managers (instead of breaking off and moving onto their own thing).

And if the user simply doesn’t have access to these services from their laptop, well, let’s face it: job satisfaction and turnover will go up.

Want to know what to look for in a personal website?

To expand on the point above, there are extra services that can help solve this issue, too. An example: If you want to host your work remotely – though an expensive perk that might eat into your sleep schedule – an FTP service may serve the same function as a fast-loading browser tab.

Of course, there are other more traditional services, like email and instant messaging, that you can also use. Just think: What could you be getting instead of an inbox full of mails you don’t have the attention to read?

The bottom line?

Building a remote presence that truly works is a balancing act of efficiency, creativity, quality and flexibility.

We also do wonder: What will it be like to stop having this growing need to create for our customers? Instead, we imagine – what if we find someone else who does the things we want to do and, in doing so, delivers me something entirely different? Maybe we’d even consider doing what we’d always thought was impossible: choosing a coworker we care for and another who we respect.

And that’s what it’s really about. Not all of us love our work. The trick for anyone who wants to keep up their happy camper is getting out of our personal comfort zone. Whether to get the results they need to be happy, or perhaps to make changes in their family life that will be transformational for them.

Dr. Louis Roche is the Principal of Online Work Solutions, Inc., a career services company that provides its services and products to HR professionals and others who need to help their employees and clients use the digital world effectively. For more information, visit www.onlineworkservicessolutions.com.

Leave a Comment