Catherine Mottram, Asia Pacific head of Facebook policy, quits

Catherine Mottram, Facebook’s Asia Pacific head of public policy, has departed the company after a rocky few months that included the passing of its controversial Data Protection law. “We all worked very hard to…

Catherine Mottram, Asia Pacific head of Facebook policy, quits

Catherine Mottram, Facebook’s Asia Pacific head of public policy, has departed the company after a rocky few months that included the passing of its controversial Data Protection law.

“We all worked very hard to make India a global success and in the process have grown from three employees to over 7,000 people. Many of us have grown up here. And as Facebook heads towards the future, it’s time for a change,” reads a post on her personal Facebook page.

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Mottram had previously been a small-town councillor in Grimsby, where she taught geography and coached netball.

She joined Facebook in 2011 as vice president of public policy and government relations for the Asia Pacific region. Prior to Facebook, she worked at Legal & General where she was head of its communications and corporate affairs in the UK. She also worked at Sky Media, News Group Newspapers and The Telegraph.

Since then, Facebook has faced a number of damaging incidents that have underlined its lack of due diligence, and created a sense of distrust amongst users and regulators.

India cracked down on how users can amend their privacy settings after local users had problems with their settings changing to Facebook Messenger when Facebook incorporated its popular messaging app into the platform.

The company also found itself in trouble after a leaked leak of data from 50 million users, resulting in a public apology from founder Mark Zuckerberg. The incident followed similar revelations in Europe that also underlined Facebook’s questionable data-sharing practices.

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In addition, the social media giant came under fire after being forced to notify thousands of users, including children, when they were duped by a fake BBC hoax story that claimed the social media network was hiring people to kill babies.

Facebook later came under fire for the January 2015 deletion of the data of Cambridge Analytica’s whistleblower Christopher Wylie. Following the scandal, the Australian competition and consumer commission (ACCC) has opened an investigation into the firm’s business model.

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