Congress needs a deal – or the government shuts down

“We want a short-term deal,” said Sen. Sherrod Brown of Ohio, Democrats’ top spending spokesman, “if there is a short-term deal.” “We want a real long-term deal. The administration wants a short-term deal. A…

Congress needs a deal - or the government shuts down

“We want a short-term deal,” said Sen. Sherrod Brown of Ohio, Democrats’ top spending spokesman, “if there is a short-term deal.” “We want a real long-term deal. The administration wants a short-term deal. A lot of Republicans have said we want a long-term deal. And if we get a short-term deal, we don’t want to go into a short-term deal,” he added. “There is no agreement.” “We want a short-term deal,” said Sen. Sherrod Brown of Ohio, Democrats’ top spending spokesman, “if there is a short-term deal.” “We want a real long-term deal. The administration wants a short-term deal. A lot of Republicans have said we want a long-term deal. And if we get a short-term deal, we don’t want to go into a short-term deal,” he added. “There is no agreement.”

Democratic leaders have been crafting a bipartisan package for two weeks but a variety of new wrinkles have emerged in the meantime, sources tell CNN.

The White House has agreed to add $750 billion to the one-year stopgap, which would be $1.5 trillion.

Their plan is to pass a bill that raises the debt ceiling through December and then temporarily undo the government shutdown.

It would then produce bills for the Pentagon and for construction and engineering infrastructure projects.

The Obama administration has rejected a second bill from Senate Republicans to raise spending caps in a broader deal.

The White House wants a single long-term deal to implement the tax code reforms it wants.

Congress does not have a deal yet to prevent a November 30 government shutdown.

However, leadership is getting ready to bring Democrats back together once again in the coming days after a partisan standoff allowed one of their leaders, Democratic Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer of New York, to strike a deal with President Donald Trump Thursday to increase the $1.3 trillion cap on defense and non-defense discretionary spending to keep the government running through December.

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