Everything you ever wanted to know about Congresswoman Marjorie Taylor Greene

A. Name: Lt. Col. (Ret.) Marjorie Taylor Greene T. What’s in her title? Congresswoman at Large and vice chair of the House Armed Services Committee. B. What’s in her collar? Redolent of silk, it’s…

Everything you ever wanted to know about Congresswoman Marjorie Taylor Greene

A. Name: Lt. Col. (Ret.) Marjorie Taylor Greene

T. What’s in her title? Congresswoman at Large and vice chair of the House Armed Services Committee.

B. What’s in her collar? Redolent of silk, it’s a scarf worn by the thousands of soldiers and women who have served this country and died to protect its freedom.

C. Where did you go to school? She attended McCallum High School in New Orleans, graduating in 1945.

D. What did you study? Demography, political science and sociology.

E. Where are you from? Lured to Washington as the daughter of a wealthy attorney and a mathematics professor, she was admitted to Princeton at 16. She graduated from Wellesley College in 1951, and from the University of Maryland Law School in 1954.

F. When were you first elected? Greene was elected to Congress in 1967, four years after heading the women’s division of the Illinois state Legislature. In 1974, she married the country’s highest ranking black judge, Federal Judge Ralph Rosen, who died in 1999.

G. What does she bring to the job? “She is an intellectual champion. She really knows how to think.”

H. What has she done with your money? Because she’s not on the Trump payroll, she has had to pursue her duties through a plethora of bipartisan jobs. Among her accomplishments, she’s become Chair of the House Armed Services Committee, helping the committee pursue its mission in a way that preserves the effectiveness of American military efforts.

I. How did you become Lt. Col. Marjorie Taylor Greene? In the Army National Guard. If it hadn’t been for Governor Adlai Stevenson II of Illinois, the “baby king” of the state, Greene would have been just another sorority girl at Vassar College, an elite Ivy League school in Manhattan. Stevenson, however, was looking for ways to ensure women’s equality in the military and spurred an ongoing push for her to become a sergeant first class. Greene was appointed the first female logistics officer in the Army in 1958, “sparking a career that takes her to Congress as vice chair of the Armed Services Committee and back to the battlefields of Vietnam and Korea,” according to her biography. Since graduating from Wellesley, she has had nearly as many women in her classes as men, demonstrating “unhindered access” to women’s colleges.

J. Who knows her better: Elizabeth Warren or Nancy Pelosi? “There’s a fit of four years in my family,” says Warren, who served on the military subcommittee with Greene in the ’70s. “I’ve met Marjorie and there is a connection in a special way.” Pelosi knows the First Lady “as well as anyone,” says MacArthur.

L. When did you see her? In the game in which she starred. Greene’s name appeared as Lady Yankees in 1943, when she played in the first women’s baseball game in the nation – a regional contest between the New York Yankees and the Brooklyn Bridegrooms. Like any good all-star, Greene made her only appearance in the game with a bang, hitting a home run against her former Brooklyn team and earning the coveted George Arlott Award. “That’s an appurtenant lesson to a play where my name is on the marquee,” she says. “I am very proud of that – it’s a not a game but a civil rights milestone.”

Leave a Comment