The VR “must-have product” that’s elusive

The tech industry is drowning in news about virtual reality, and virtual reality hardware, in particular. Companies like Alphabet are pushing Google Cardboard, Facebook has tested the market for its own headsets, and HTC’s…

The VR “must-have product” that’s elusive

The tech industry is drowning in news about virtual reality, and virtual reality hardware, in particular.

Companies like Alphabet are pushing Google Cardboard, Facebook has tested the market for its own headsets, and HTC’s Vive has been on display at most major tech fairs.

But some wonder whether, or when, we might see the “must-have product” of virtual reality that everyone’s been waiting for.

The new technology — the buzz words are immersive experiences, but they’re really just a fancy word for something immersive — has the potential to shake up the world of product design.

Unfortunately, not many design houses are developing their work in VR yet.

At the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas in January, the Best and Brightest Media’s 20 Designer of the Year Awards were awarded to Zaha Hadid, who designed the new Sustain environment in Egypt; Tom Dixon for his Dixon Dollhouse, a new interactive store in New York; Ryan Breslin for his Light Projections, which makes skyscrapers come to life, and Adam Richards of Souvenir, whose intricate reproductions of paintings are a new part of the cultural canon.

But none of these worked in VR, or were showcased in VR. They were born in typical newspaper typefaces, not high-tech, head-mounted displays.

Read the full story on Quartz.

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